Monday, April 02, 2012

Commenting on a Facebook Post

Today, one of my friends posted this on Facebook.  Ordinarily, I would just have shared it with my other friends from there, but this particular photo was in an album.  I have found out that sharing one photo from an album sometimes shares the entire collection, and I don’t like that idea, so I saved this photo to my computer and want to comment here.

introvert

My comment:  First of all introvert and extrovert are not absolutes; they are opposite ends of a continuum.  Almost all people have some characteristics of both depending on circumstances.  However, it seems that we are in a society that is pushing more toward the practice of constant extroverted behavior in which people have to be socially connected 24-7, electronically if not face to face.  The poster above is phrased somewhat unfortunately, because absolutes are not always possible to carry out, but when read as suggestions of ways to deal with the more introverted among us, the suggestions could be helpful.  “Introverted” is a word with negative connotations today.  There are, however, real advantages to being a person who is comfortable enough with himself to be alone without freaking out.  There are jobs which are best done alone rather than as a member of a “team.”  Very creative people often require a certain amount of solitude to fulfill potential. 

What set me off to comment about this?  It was another comment which suggested that following any of these suggestions was like “coddling” a drug addict and implied that this kind of personality was a choice and a negative choice at that.  While I realize there is probably an extreme end of the spectrum that needs real help in learning to function at all in or with society, I can’t help but feel that there is room for people who observe and plan carefully before rushing in, who give thoughtful opinions rather than the first tweet out of their head, who value a few good friends and long-lasting friendships, and who regard privacy as a virtue instead of just letting everything “hang out” on public display.

6 comments:

Carrie said...

There's a great TED talk on "the power of introverts."

Lee said...

I see most of this as common curtesy. Two statements I've read about introverts and extroverts are 1) an extrovert needs to be around people to recharge, an introrvert needs to be alone to recharge, and 2) an extrovert speaks before he thinks, and introvert thinks before he speaks.

Deborah said...

I agree. People who are always "in your face" are usually insecure. Maybe the introverts aren't insecure.

Anonymous said...

This would be a good list for many autistic people too.

Noreen said...

I especially like the item about teaching us new skills in private!

Anonymous said...

It is probably in your face extreme extroverts who say that being an introvert is a malady that must be corrected. If being an introvert is only a problem for others, it is their problem. I have found the demand for instant answers and the command "get excited about this" from extrovert trainers at business training classes was a problem for me. I had to pretend to take on some extrovert ways at work to satisfy them.